Supercharge Your Job Descriptions into Powerful Performance Management Tools

iPad Compatible

HRCI Category: Business  |  Credits: 3  |  $40

You will receive HRCI recertification credits AND SHRM PDC’s

Everyone wants to hire and manage superior people.  But how do you define and optimize performance?  A widely used, but rarely leveraged tool is the job description.  But I’m not talking about dusting off your everyday, normal job description.   Traditional job descriptions that list skills, experience, academics, and competencies are misleading — they describe the person, not the job — and are the primary reason companies are challenged to match the right people to the job.

Performance is about results, not about skills and qualifications. That’s why we must stop writing our job descriptions as an exhaustive list of activities and  attributes, and start identifying the reason they are performing these activities — to get a result.

A results focused job description is a tool for clearly describing what an individual needs to do to be considered successful. In addition it will serve as the foundation for on-boarding and performance management. When jobs are defined from a results perspective, it is much easier to understand how they connect to strategy, how pivotal they are in driving the achievement of that strategy, and whether or not the incumbent is up to the task.  That’s where a results-focused job description can rocket your performance systems to a new level.

After completing this course you will be able to:

  • Develop your own results-focused job descriptions; helping you bring the performance of your organization to the next level.

You’ll Receive these Valuable Tools

  • Results focused Job Description template
  • Checklist for Reviewing the Job Description
  • Guiding Principles for Performance Measurement
  • Job Description Examples

 

What your colleagues are saying:

“For the metrics portion, I found it useful to look at the types of information that may be useful to present. I liked the section on benchmarking and how to avoid it because of the apples-to-oranges issue. Made good sense to me. Also, the comparison of benchmarking to strategic metrics was great. The simple explanations of what metrics are was helpful. Most of us know them on a basic level but don’t use them correctly or enough. This illustrated how to use them to show that HR is not just a cost that the organization has to carry, but that it can be repositioned as a partner that helps the company meet its goals.”

— Susan, HR Officer

“I was impressed by the content and delivery of the material. The subject matter is directly relevant to my objectives for the upcoming year; thus, I felt better equipped to approach talent management and HR metrics for my organization.”

— Maura, Director of HR